Face Masks Currently In Stock – updated

Popular favorite “rogue planets” pattern is back in stock!
** 25% off all small-sized masks through the end of October! **

Inventory of my hand-made fabric face masks constantly changes, with new patterns added weekly. Check back often and don’t hesitate if you see something you like!

Masks are $16 (+tax). Sale price is ($12 +tax).

Click here to get a detailed description of my hand-made masks.

BACK IN STOCK!
Large
NEW!
Large
BACK IN STOCK!
Large
NEW!
Large
NEW!
Large
Small – limited quantity
NEW!
Large

SOLD OUT
NEW!
Large
Small – only 1 left!
NEW!
Large – SOLD OUT
Small
NEW!
Small – just one left!
Large – SOLD OUT
Small
Large
Small (limited quantity)
Small only
Large
Small only
Small only
Small only
SOLD OUT
Large – SOLD OUT
Small (limited quantity)
SALE – 25% off
Large
SOLD OUT
SALE – 25% off
Large – only 1 left!
SALE – 25% off
Small – only 1 left!

How to purchase a face mask from Noyes Street Knits

Masks are $16 + tax, plus shipping (usually under $3) if needed. There are currently two sizes of mask: large (6 ½-inches top to bottom) and small (for kids, 5 ½-inches top to bottom). I accept payment with Zelle and Venmo.

If you’re in the Chicago area: Please contact me here to make a purchase and we’ll arrange for pickup or drop off. I’m also on Facebook and Instagram.

If you live in the state of Illinois: Send an inquiry here about availability and shipping or place an order on my Etsy site. I’m also on Facebook and Instagram.

If you live outside the state of Illinois: Please place your order on my Ety site.

Click here to contact me now!

Here to Help You Mask-Up in Style

I’ve been busy making face masks!

While sheltering in place this past March, I put down the knitting needles and brushed off my long-neglected sewing machine to create some fabric face masks of my own. My sister, a recently unemployed engineer who loves a good project, tinkered with the design while I sewed up a storm, and a few weeks later we had a regular production line going, supplying masks to friends, family, and the community at large.

My Noyes Street Knits fitted face mask is made from two layers of 100% cotton which can be machine washed and dried. It’s designed to fit snugly under the chin, crimped on the bridge of the nose with a nose wire, and sloped slightly under the eyes for better comfort and sight.

Masks are reversible, with a removable nose wire, and pocket for a filter (not included.) They come with customizable ear loops made of washable t-shirt cord. Adjust the loops using the cord locks for a snug fit that’s comfortable on the ears.

There are currently two sizes of mask: large (6 ½-inches top to bottom) and small (for kids, 5 ½-inches top to bottom).

As with my knitting projects, this is a labor of love. I enjoy finding new fun fabrics and color combinations. It looks as if face masks will be a part of our future for a little while longer, so we might as well have fun with it.


How to purchase a face mask from Noyes Street Knits

Masks are $16 + tax, plus shipping (usually under $3) if needed. I accept payment with Zelle and Venmo.

If you’re in the Chicago area: Please contact me here to make a purchase and we’ll arrange for pickup or drop off. I’m also on Facebook and Instagram.

If you live in the state of Illinois: Send an inquiry here about availability and shipping or place an order on my Etsy site. I’m also on Facebook and Instagram.

If you live outside the state of Illinois: Please place your order on my Etsy site.

I’ll do my best to keep this post up-to-date as different styles become available. Inventory is constantly changing and I’m adding new patterns every week, so check back often and don’t hesitate if you see something you like!

Click here to contact me now!


Ah, Sweet Peanut Butter Treat of My Youth

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These peanut butter bars were a staple of San Diego public school cafeteria lunches from the 70s through the 90s (or so a quick internet search told me), and I remember them well. I loved these sweet, peanut buttery treats so much that I asked the cafeteria ladies for the recipe. The backside of the card notes the cooking temp (350-degrees) and the time (20-25 minutes) and I was very surprised to see coconut in the ingredients list. That I don’t remember.

I was curious to see how they lived up to memory, so last night we baked up a batch and wow, are they ever sweet. Definitely satisfied my recent craving for a peanut butter cookie, but I think I’m good for another forty years.

Whyyyy Would You Call It This?

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Another from the old family recipe box. There are a couple of things to puzzle over in this cornbread recipe, starting with the very questionable name. Gringo? Really? And is that because of the wimpy combination of cheddar and Jack cheeses? Then there’s the strange #303 delineation for the can of creamed corn. Now we’d identify the can size or amount by ounces.

Finally, I can’t say I remember ever eating this. I’m going to guess from the huge serving amount, that it was saved for large gatherings. If at all. What I do remember is the family going through many boxes of Jiffy cornbread mix, baked in corncob-shaped muffin pans.

Family Recipe: Crab Bake

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Here’s another from the green plastic recipe box archive, which I have no recollection of ever eating. Yet another recipe featuring cans of things rather than fresh. So much cream, so much mayo, so much white bread filler, and, with only a teaspoon of shredded (??) onion and half as much salt, so little flavor! Finally, nothing says 1970s like a cornflake crumble crust!

Is anyone else nervous that you let this dairy and crab concoction sit on the counter for an hour before you bake it?

A Culinary Time Capsule

Many years ago, while home over Thanksgiving, I came across my mother’s plastic green recipe box, crammed full of probably twenty years’ worth of culinary delights. My mother died in 1980, so when I pulled this box from its drawer (where it had been hiding in plain sight for a couple of decades) and finally delved in to see what was there, it was like opening a time capsule. A familiar, dated, comforting, and sometimes repulsive time capsule of cooking.

As we went through the recipes and pulled out some real gems, many of which I’d never seen (let alone eaten) before, we were howling with laughter, so hard at times it brought tears. I vowed to scan these recipes for safe keeping and to share them with friends. Many years after lugging this recipe box home on the plane, it seems the time is right. Here is the first of many edible (that’s debatable) delights (also debatable). Bon appetit!

I give you Eleanor’s Luncheon Salad. It’s an entire luncheon in a salad! I dare you to get through the ingredients list without feeling a little queasy.

eleanors luncheon salad

The Sounds of Baseball When We Need Them Most

Hey Cubs fans! Some good news. We may not have 2020 baseball (yet) but we can feed our souls with the sweet sounds of the game beginning April 1, when 670 The Score will begin broadcasting the entire 2016 postseason, one game each night. They’ll also have Pat & Ron giving some live thoughts before, during and after each game. Should be a treat.

Here’s a link to a schedule of the games.

The first game is on Wednesday at 6pm CST. I plan to treat it like opening day, wear my Cubs gear all day, maybe order out hotdogs for dinner, crack open a beer, and listen to the game. Who’s with me?